Biophysical Foundations of Human Movement

Author(s): Bruce Abernethy

Medical & Nursing

Presenting the latest research in the field of human movement, this updated edition introduces readers to key concepts concerning the anatomical, mechanical, physiological, neural, and psychological bases of human movement. It provides students with a broad foundation for more detailed study of the subdisciplines of human movement and for cross-disciplinary studies. Readers will learn the multi-dimensional changes in movement and movement potential that occur throughout the life span as well as those changes that occur as adaptations to training, practice and other lifestyle factors.

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Bruce Abernethy, is professor of human movement science in the School of Human Movement Studies and deputy executive dean and associate dean (research) in the faculty of health sciences at the University of Queensland. Stephanie J. Hanrahan is a registered sport psychologist and an associate professor in the Schools of Human Movement Studies and Psychology at the University of Queensland. Vaughan Kippers, is a senior lecturer in the School of Biomedical Sciences at the University of Queensland.

Part I. Introduction to Human Movement Studies; Part II. Anatomical Bases of Human Movement: Functional Anatomy; Part III. Mechanical Bases of Human Movement: Biomechanics; Part IV. Physiological Bases of Human Movement: Exercise Physiology; Part V. Neural Bases of Human Movement: Motor Control; Part VI. Psychological Bases of Human Movement; Part VII. Multi- and Cross-Disciplinary Applications to Human Movement Science.

General Fields

  • : 9781450431651
  • : Human Kinetics Publishers
  • : Human Kinetics Publishers
  • : May 2013
  • : 279mm X 216mm
  • : United States
  • : June 2013
  • : books

Special Fields

  • : Bruce Abernethy
  • : Hardback
  • : 3rd Revised edition
  • : 612.76
  • : 456
  • : 198 illustrations, 63 photos